Coconut Oil – an Ideal Brain Food

There are only two types of fuel your body can convert into energy: carbs/sugar, or fat. Again, ketones are what your body produces when it converts fat (as opposed to glucose) into energy. And a primary source of ketone bodies are the medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) found in coconut oil. In fact, coconut oil contains about 66 percent MCTs. It’s a super-brain food. Other super-brain foods

While your brain is quite happy running on glucose, there’s evidence suggesting that ketone bodies may actually help restore and renew neurons and nerve function in your brain, even after damage has set in (new research suggests that eating coconut oil can help with Alzheimer’s disease). Interestingly, the mechanism of this MCT-ketone metabolism appears to be that your body treats MCTs as a carbohydrate and not a fat.  This allows the ketone energy to hit your bloodstream without the normal insulin spike associated with carbohydrates entering your bloodstream. So in effect, coconut oil is a fat that acts like a carbohydrate when it comes to brain fuel.

How much coconut oil might you need? The recommendation is to start with one teaspoon, taken with food in the mornings. Gradually add more coconut oil every few days until you are able to tolerate about four tablespoons. It’s best to take it with food, to avoid upsetting your stomach. Read more about the benefits of coconut oil

Summary of The Drugs Don’t Work by Professor Dame Sally Davies: The Drugs Don’t Work!

The Drugs Don't Work

The Drugs Don't Work

Some books are summarised with the title as this publication The Drugs Don’t Work by Professor Dame Sally Davies who is a chief medical adviser to the UK government on health issues. Her findings are very simple: “We are losing the battle against infections diseases. Bacteria are fighting back and are becoming resistant to modern medicine. In short, the drugs don’t work.” Hence the title “The Drugs Don’t Work.” Her best and most important advise is to wash your hands properly. (Her second tip is to stop demanding antimicrobial medicines when we have a viral infection and to raise awareness of the threat of antimicrobial resistance). Read more about the importance of reading summaries

 

 

A History of Speed Reading and Spd Rdng

Set your purpose for speed reading this article
Before you start reading the article, think what sort of information you would expect to find in this article. Then spend two minutes previewing the article and setting your purpose. After getting into a good state, set your timer for 20 minutes and jot down information from the article which fulfils your purpose.

Sample purposes
Choose only one, or something better of your own.
1 Write a timeline of 6 key developments in spd rdng
2 Find 6 spd rdng techniques I will definitely use
3 Identify 6 spd rdng techniques and the names (and approximate dates) of the 6 different people who originally developed them 

A History of Speed Reading and Spd Rdng

Ever since people have been reading, many of them have been trying to read faster and more effectively. Oddly, though, apart from some early exploration by the US Air Force who held the first formal speed reading course at Syracuse University in 1925, there has been little or no support from educational establishments or governments. Even though you would think there were academic plaudits or increased educational attainments to be gained by the first organization or country to implement a reading programme which could take students beyond the basics, all advances seem to have been made by committed individuals who have remained outside the formal education system, and that is still the situation today.

In an interview with Bill Gates he was asked, “If you could have one superpower what would it be?” He responded with, “The ability to read super fast.”

Continue reading

The world’s largest collection of photos of the coolest and most interesting bookshelves

Starting with this cool Chuck shelves: the six very flexible plywood planks (4mm thick) that can bend around your possessions – ideally books (to the tune of  €850:).

And follow this link to see the largest collection of the best and most interesting bookshelves in the world. If you’re a book-lover it’s a feast for the eye and the mind. This one below is my favourite, since I only own ebooks now (read how I digitised all my library).

digital books wallpaper

Digital books shelves wallpaper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To boost your memory make a fist

Fist clenching can boost your memory, suggests a new study on memory. It works because clenching your fist can change the way your brain functions by increase activity in your brain on the opposite side (so if you clench your right fist, activity in the left brain hemisphere increases). If you’re right-handed, the left side of your brain encodes information while the right side helps you retrieve memories, while the opposite is true for left-handed people. This is how to utilise this memory aid: if you’re right-handed you would make a fist with your right hand when you want to remember something, ie a name, fact or number and when you need to recall it, clench your left fist. Other ways to boost memory include: exercise, vitamin B12, animal-based omega-3 fats, proper sleep, and  optimising your vitamin D levels and avoiding sugar which can damage your memory and learning.

Productivity tools: Liquid4 – for finding key info quickly and effectively

Liquid4 is a very powerful Mac tool for research, study, referencing and more. It speeds up finding information and converting date: it helps you to do something with any text selected. It’s very easy to use. It’s perfect for students, business people and anyone interested in personal development. It’s a revolutionary processing tool that will help you get information and answers fast and with less effort. FREE version available.
Just a few neat functions: 1) the convert menu deals with currency, temperature, area, speed and more 2) the copy section’s citation will produce a Harvard reference-ready structure complete with the date 3) translation to more than 30 languages is available in the paid version 4) share function puts any selected text into a Facebook post, tweet or into an email, etc.

Summarising pays off

Nick D’Aloisio (London, UK) sold his mobile app (summly) for undisclosed sum of money to Yahoo. The app ‘summaries’ articles for quick reading. The schoolboy will work full-time for Yahoo and do A-levels in the evening (read more about the study biorhythms of teenagers) To sum up, summarising made him a millioner. Read more about the value of summaries

Don’t make teenagers read too early

Too early in the morning, that is. Research has shown that the teenage brain doesn’t wake up till 9-10am (tell us something we don’t know!) – and finally there’s a school in the UK which is hoping that exam results will improve since they decided to start a bit later. The UCL Academy in London starts at 10am and school’s not out till 5.30, but already they’re getting positive feedback from their pupils, and attendance and punctuality are excellent (according to the head). They are being supported (and closely monitored) by researchers at University College, London. Apparently the teenage ‘time-shift’ lasts till about the age of 21, but till then, they’re likely to be able to concentrate better, read better, learn better and get better exam results if they’re allowed to get that bit of extra sleep in the morning.

People who read make more money.

It pays to read books

It pays to read books

Grupo Cometa (a car and motocycle dealer, Cáceres, Brazil) pays its employees for reading books. The company developed a reading programme to help employees to enhance their skills and knowledge. To encourage employees to read books the company pays them an extra one month salary at the end of the year. The main purpose of the programme is to boost professional development with books on relations, management and the company’s operations. The programme is voluntary but 80% of 1350 employees who work in 15 shops already joined it. “Some employees made comments that since they started reading, their skills improved, as well as the relations at home, and some even started to study again.” said  in “Uol Economia” CEO of the Grupo Cometa, Cristinei Melo.

 

 

 

 

The World Book Day – 7 March 2013

Who Owns The Future by Jaron Lanier

Who Owns The Future by Jaron Lanier

How are you celebrating the World Book Day today?
I’ve download a few books and will spend 20 minute speed reading them. Just got Who Owns The Future by Jaron Lanier who coined the term ‘virtual reality’. Although the word ‘virtual’ was originally coined by John Duns Scotus in the 13th century (to denote God) who develop a concentration technique for reading sometimes called ‘the duns cap’. Watch an interview with Jaron Lanier talking about the future of internet and why we should be paid for walking down the street.

 

 

 

 

 

German translation of the Speed Reading Bible is now available on Kindle: SchnlLsn – die Schnelllesebibel: Das Buch ds schnlln Lsns – Schnelllesebuch mit 37 Techniken, Tipps und Strategien für ultraschnelles Lesen (Speed Reading) (SchnelLesen Speed Reading Schneller lesen)

German flagGerman translation of the Speed Reading Bible is now available on Kindle: SchnlLsn – die Schnelllesebibel: Das Buch ds schnlln Lsns – Schnelllesebuch mit 37 Techniken, Tipps und Strategien für ultraschnelles Lesen (Speed Reading) (SchnelLesen Speed Reading Schneller lesen)

How to think like Sherlock Holmes?

Ceci n'est pas une pipe" ("This is not a pipe"),

Ceci n'est pas une pipe" ("This is not a pipe"),

What can we learn from Sherlock Holmes in terms of speed reading and reading in general? Reading is just one part of the learning process ie getting information in and then thinking about that information makes it ours and useful. But having the right ‘speed reading’ mindset before approaching any written material will also help to get better quality of information (knowing what to look at and what to overlook – ie the previewing technique). Sherlock Holmes was a perfect example of a lifelong learner following his particular type of scientific method. Sherlock Holmes would approach his cases with a specific mindset and a goal (similar to speed reading SMART purpose). Constant feedback loop was also essential to Holmes learnings, tells Maria Konnikova, author of a new book Mastermind: How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes.  Watch her talking about how to think like Sherlock Holmes.

Italian translation of The Speed Reading Bible is now available on Kindle: Lttra Vlce – La Bibbia della Lettura Veloce: Il Libro della Lettura Veloce con 37 Tecniche e Strategie per la Lettura Super Rapida (Lettura Rapida, Lettura Veloce)

Italian flagItalian translation of The Speed Reading Bible is now available on Kindle: Lttra Vlce – La Bibbia della Lettura Veloce: Il Libro della Lettura Veloce con 37 Tecniche e Strategie per la Lettura Super Rapida (Lettura Rapida, Lettura Veloce)